L

  • LYNCH-LAW.

    LYNCH-LAW. - A common phrase used to express the vengeance of a mob, inflicting an injury, and committing an outrage upon a person suspected of some offence. In England this is called Lidford Law. Toml.L. Dict. art. Lidford Law.

  • LYING IN WAIT.

    LYING IN WAIT. - Being in ambush for the purpose of murdering another. 2. Lying in wait is evidence of deliberation and intention. 3. Where murder is divided into degrees, as in Pennsylvania, lying in wait is such evidence of malice, th...

  • LYING IN GRANT

    LYING IN GRANT - . Incorporeal rights and things which cannot be transferred by livery of possession, but which exist only in idea, in contemplation of law, are said to lie in grant, and pass by the mere delivery of the deed. Vide Grant; Liv...

  • LUNATIC,

    LUNATIC, - persons. One who has had an understanding, but who, by disease, grief, or other accident, has lost the use of his reason. A lunatic is properly one who has had lucid intervals, sometimes enjoying his senses, and sometimes not. 4...

  • LUNAR.

    LUNAR. - That which belongs to the moon; relating to the moon as a lunar month. See Month.

  • LUNACY,

    LUNACY, - med. jur. A disease of the mind, which is differently defined as it applies to a class of disorders, or only to one species of them. As a general term it includes all the varieties of mental, disorders, not fatuous. 2. Lunacy...

  • LUGGAGE.

    LUGGAGE. - Such things as are carried by a traveller, generally for his personal accommodation; baggage. In England this word is generally used in the same sense that baggage is used in the United States. See Baggage.

  • LUCRI CAUSA.

    LUCRI CAUSA. - This is a Latin expression, which signifies that the thing to which it applies is done for the sake of gain. 2. It was supposed that when a larceny was committed the taking should have been lucri causa; but it has been consi...

  • LUCRE.

    LUCRE. - Gain, profit. Cl. des Lois Rom. h. t.

  • LUCID INTERVAL

    LUCID INTERVAL - , med. jur. That space of time between two fits of insanity, during which a person non compos mentis is completely restored to the perfect enjoyment of reason upon every subject upon which the mind was previously cognizant....

  • LTTIGIOUS RIGHTS,

    LTTIGIOUS RIGHTS, - French law. Those which are or may be contested either in whole or in part, whether an action has been commenced, or when there is reason to apprehend one. Poth. Vente, n. 584; 9 Mart. R. 183; Troplong, De la Vente, n. 9...

  • LOYALTY.

    LOYALTY. - That which adheres to the law, that which sustains an existing government. See Penal Laws of China, 3.

  • LOYAL

    LOYAL - . Legal; according to law; as, loyal matrimony, a lawful marriage; at- tached to the existing law.

  • LOW WATER MARK.

    LOW WATER MARK. - That part of the shore of the sea to which the waters re- cede when the tide is the lowest. Vide High Water Mark; River; Sea Shore; Dane's Ab. h. t.; 1 Halst. R. 1.

  • LOUISIANA.

    LOUISIANA. - The name of one of the new states of the United States of America. This state was admitted into the Union by the act of congress, entitled "An act for the admission of the state of Louisiana into the Union, and to extend the law...

  • Louisiana

    Louisiana - . Orleans Term Reports. By Martin. From 1809 to 1812. 2 vols in 1. Louisiana Term Reports. By Martin, From 1812 to 1823. 10 vols. Martin's Reports, N. S. (sometimes cited simply New Series,) 1823 to 1830. 8 vols. The whole o...

  • LOTTERY

    LOTTERY - . A scheme for the distribution of prizes by chance. 2. In most, if not all of the United States, lotteries not specially authorized by the legislatures of the respective states are prohibited, and the persons concerned in establi...

  • LOT.

    LOT. - Anything on which depends the accidental determination of a right by which we acquire or lose something; or it is that which fortuitously deter-mines what we are to acquire. When it can be certainly known what are our rights, we ough...

  • LOT OF GROUND.

    LOT OF GROUND. - A small piece of land in a town or city usually employed for building, a yard, a garden or such other urban use. Lots are in-lots, or those within the boundary of the city or town, and out-lots, those which are out of such...

  • LOST.

    LOST. - What was once possessed and cannot now be found. 2. When a bond or other deed was lost, formerly the obligee or plaintiff was compelled to go into equity to seek relief, because there was no remedy a law, the plaintiff being requir...