U

  • UTTER BARRISTER,

    UTTER BARRISTER, - English law, Those barristers who plead without the bar, and are distinguished from benchers, or those who have been readers and who are allowed to plead within the bar, as the king's counsel are. The same as ouster barri...

  • UTI POSSIDETIS.

    UTI POSSIDETIS. - This phrase, which means as you possess, is used in international law to signify that the parties to a treaty are to retain possession of what they have acquired by force during the war.

  • UTERINE BROTHER,

    UTERINE BROTHER, - domestic relations. A brother by the mother's side.

  • USURY,

    USURY, - contracts. The illegal profit which is required and received by the lender of a sum of money from the borrower for its use. In a more extended and improper sense, it is the receipt of any profit whatever for the use of money: it is...

  • USURPER

    USURPER - , government. One who assumes the right of government by force, contrary to and in violation of the constitution of the country. Toull. Dr. Civ. n. 32. Vide Tyranny,

  • USURPED POWER,

    USURPED POWER, - insurance. By an article of the printed proposals which are considered as making a part of the contract of insurance it is provided, that "No loss of damage by fire, happening by any invasion, foreign enemy, or any military...

  • USURPATION,

    USURPATION, - government. The tyrannical assumption of the government by force contrary to and in violation of the constitution of the country.

  • USURPATION,

    USURPATION, - torts. The unlawful assumption of the use of property which belongs to another; an interruption or the disturbing a man in his right and possession. Toml. Law Dict. h. t. 2. According to Lord Coke, there are two kinds of usu...

  • USUFRUCTUARY,

    USUFRUCTUARY, - civil law. One who has the right and enjoyment of an usufruct. 2. Domat, with his usual clearness, points out the duties of the usufructuary, which are, 1. To make an inventory of the things subject to the usu-fruct, in...

  • USUFRUCT,

    USUFRUCT, - civil law. The right of enjoying a thing, the property of which is vested in another, and to draw from the same all the profit, utility and advantage which it may produce, provided it be without altering the substance of the thi...

  • USUCAPTION,

    USUCAPTION, - civil law. The manner of acquiring property in things by the lapse of time required by law. 2. It differs from prescription, which has the same sense, and means, in addition, the manner of acquiring and losing, by the effect...

  • USHER.

    USHER. - This word is said to be derived from a huissier, and is the name of an inferior officer in some English courts of law Archb. Pr. 25.

  • USEFUL.

    USEFUL. - That which may be put into beneficial practice. 2. The patent act of congress of July 4, 1836, sect. 6, in describing the subjects of patents, mentions "new and useful art," and "new and useful improvement." To entitle the inven...

  • USE,

    USE, - civil law. A right of receiving so much of the natural profits of a thing as is necessary to daily sustenance; it differs from usufruct, which is a right not only to use but to enjoy. 1 Browne's Civ. Law, 184; Lecons Elem. du Dr. Civ...

  • USE,

    USE, - estates. A confidence reposed in another, who was made tenant of the land or terre tenant, that he should dispose of the land according to the intention of the cestui que use, or him to whose use it was granted, and suffer him to tak...

  • USANCE,

    USANCE, - commercial law. The term usance comes from usage, and signifies the time which by usage or custom is allowed in certain countries, for the payment of a bill of exchange. Poth. Contr. du Change, n. 15. 2. The time of one, two or...

  • USAGE.

    USAGE. - Long and uniform practice. In its most extensive meaning this term includes custom and prescription, though it differs from them in a narrower sense, it is applied to the habits, modes, and course of dealing which are observed in t...

  • URBAN.

    URBAN. - Relating to a city; but in a more general sense it signifies relating to houses. 2. It is used in this latter sense in the civil code of Louisiana, articles 706 and 707. All servitudes are established either for the use of hou...

  • UPLIFTED HAND

    UPLIFTED HAND - . When a man accused of a crime is arraigned, he is required to raise his hand, probably in order to identify the person who pleads. Perhaps for the same reason when a witness adopts a particular mode of taking an oath, as wh...

  • UNWHOLESOME FOOD.

    UNWHOLESOME FOOD. - Food not fit to be eaten; food which, if eaten, would be injurious. 2. Although the law does not in general consider a sale to be a warranty or goodness of the quality of a personal chattel, yet it is otherwise wit...